Tag Archives: Amazon Web Services

Posted on Thu, Nov 9, 2017 @ 12:35 pm

So, you’ve decided to build a cloud-based solution, but where do you go from here? There are a few key things that should be thought through, realized, and decided upon even before you start building your cloud solution. They revolve around what a customer of a cloud-based solution is looking for (hint, they aren’t looking for hundreds of features), which cloud service provider to choose, and why. Technically, cloud solutions are really Software as a Service (SaaS), so keep this in mind as we further explore and define cloud solutions.

Customer Expectations. As we discussed in our previous blog, features and functionality will not ensure you are a winner in the cloud space. Instead, they are table stakes. Without feature parity with your competition, your solution will not even be considered. Be confident in the knowledge that your competition has the same features as you. They know what your solution has, because they have an account on your system and have been using it since it’s been launched. Yup, they’re watching every move you make. Instead of features being the main leverage used to create differentiation, customers are defining a new paradigm.

In order of importance, the most common components customers say are essential for a cloud-based solution (in addition to security) are ease of use, service, support, scalability, performance and availability. More important than having hundreds of features is having usability, support and performance. The second group of components customers look for includes out-of-the-box integrations, insightful analytics, simple reporting, and lastly, a robust feature set.

Interestingly enough, people expect to use a cloud-based solution with no training, get the solution up and running in 10 minutes, and have easy access to helpful, on-demand support. OFS recommends you achieve these goals through being involved in implementation from the beginning and using tutorials, context-specific self-help systems that utilize videos, and chatbots to provide customers with self-service help on demand. For more information on how chatbots can help you provide excellent service to your customers, please see our blog series on chatbots here.

Cloud Service Providers. One of your most impactful decisions in this process is choosing which cloud service provider should host your new solution. There are many from which you can choose, and here are a few top examples:

  • Amazon Web Services (AWS) is the leader in cloud computing, with many services—including many fully managed services—and lots of community. However, a lot of AWS services seem to be going to vendor lock-in.
  • Microsoft Azure Cloud Services is considered the next leading cloud services provider after AWS. Azure is well suited to the Windows\.NET client base. Azure has adopted open source in big data, but every service coming from the traditional Microsoft stack (SQLServer, etc.) is going to be a vendor lock-in.
  • Google Cloud Platform (GCP) does not offer as many services and as much community support as AWS or Azure yet, but GCP is differentiating itself by not using vendor lock-in. Instead, this provider uses more open-source technologies.

Each cloud service provider has its own platform with its own APIs, management and reporting consoles, and technology stack. This is how these providers can offer differentiated services to their customers. There are so many factors that go into selecting a cloud solution that some businesses are not afraid to pick a multi-vendor configuration.

Whether you’re interested in using just one vendor, or you think a multi-vendor configuration is right for you, here are the most important factors to consider in your decision:

  1. How many services does this provider offer, and how many of them are fully managed?
  2. What is the community support like for this platform?
  3. Will I experience vendor lock-in issues with this service provider?
  4. What is the availability, durability and performance offered in this service provider’s SLA (9s)?
  5. Will I need to be aware of conflicts of interest if I choose this service provider?
  6. Is this service provider compliant with industry standards like PCI and HIPAA?
  7. What is the cost structure for this provider?

All the factors above will influence your choice, but the major advantage of cloud is the pay-as-you-go model: You don’t really commit to anything, so you can start experimenting with any or all platforms and mix and match, too. In addition, the new container-based architecture introduces a lot of flexibility.

To learn how you can effectively market and sell your cloud solution, stay tuned for our final blog in this series, “What are Cloud Solutions Anyway? Part 3,” coming next week. What are some of your observations about working with cloud solutions? Do you have any additional suggestions for what to consider when choosing a cloud service provider? Are you planning to implement a cloud solution for your business? Contact us here to talk with one of OFS’s tech experts, or leave us a comment to start the discussion!

About the Author

Abdul Rafay Mansoor is a technical architect at ObjectFrontier, Inc., and his work primarily involves presales consulting. Abdul has been a developer for more than a decade, and he began taking on presales consulting roles a few years ago. Abdul’s area of interest is cloud native development, and you often will find him passionately advocating cloud adoption to our clients.

 

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