Tag Archives: cloud

Posted on Wed, Apr 13, 2016 @ 6:46 am

I’m an old ­­software warhorse and wrote my first program back in 1972. Everything certainly has changed since then, but some principles endure. For example, one of my early bosses used to remark that good software was like a good axe a lumberjack used for years. Yes, the head had been changed several times and the handle was replaced a few times too, but somehow, it was still the same axe. His point was that good code should be designed and separated into components, so that as one part wears out, it can be replaced without throwing away the entire code base. Even when all the components have been replaced over time, somehow the product is still the same.

That concept of separate components with well-defined interfaces is particularly relevant in today’s digital business. As we all rush headlong into the process of digital transformation, it’s important that we don’t get so wrapped up in the latest mobile, cloud, and IoT technologies that we forget the basic notion that it will all change again. (And, like a metaphorical Yoda in the software world, I’ve lived long enough to see it change many, many times!) We can prepare for that change by moving to an API model that encapsulates our important business logic, which doesn’t change as often, from the ever-changing ways we use that logic to drive our business.

You often hear about the API economy these days, and as a veteran from the early days, I think it’s great to see us reach that nirvana of re-use we had long hoped for years ago. You no longer need to know the details of where data is stored, how it is accessed, or all the rules pertaining to it. You just call the component with an agreed-to format (API) and you instantly get the data you need to incorporate into your own program’s needs. This has given cloud-based software a tremendous boost that allows us to quickly build new software that stands on the shoulders of software already written and tested by someone else.

That same concept applies to our internal business software. If we can componentize our business rules and database access and create a set of well-defined API calls to handle things like adding a customer, calculating a payment, or giving out the current inventory level of a specific product, we are setting up our own building blocks that enable us to assemble them in new and important ways during our digital transformation efforts. Put another way, if we expect to fully participate in the API economy with other businesses, we must build our own APIs for ourselves first.

For example, APIs that record and monitor a car rental can be used by the rental agency’s website for booking purposes, by the renter’s expense management system to get the receipt and charges, and by the car’s manufacturer to provide usage information for warranty coverage.

While all this would certainly help the customer on his journey and streamline the car rental agency’s processing, it requires a lot of effort. The agency first must simplify its backend systems by getting rid of duplicate systems of record that store rental information inherited from prior acquisitions.  However, it takes years to decommission old systems of record. In the meantime, it may be necessary to design and build lower-level APIs around each of the duplicate systems and then build higher-level APIs to hide the fact that some of the data is actually stored in different systems. Neither the renter, nor his expense management system, nor the car manufacturer care one bit about which internal system the agency is using to record the transactions they need. You need to have your APIs mask all that complexity so you can offer a single view into your company and a single way to do business. This is the essence of what APIs offer to both your external customers and your own developers.

While it might be nice to try to build APIs for all your corporate data, the reality is that even if you could do it, the time and cost required would be prohibitive. You have to focus on building your APIs over time, embedding the work to do them in each of the short-term projects that our business requires. This requires some real discipline, as it always takes longer to build some APIs first than it would to just bang out the code asked for by the business.

Also, it always seems that your own staff, who are building new APIs, are the last ones to use them. However, by incenting them through carrots and sticks (like authorship awards for new APIs or penalties for not using them), you’ll create the ability to change the axehead and handle of your systems while keeping the essence of them the same.

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